June 13, 2013 // Category: Fitness Community

Last month we talked about how the personal training industry is growing rapidly around the world. It’s a great profession that I am proud to be a part of as an in-home trainer and Life Fitness Academy Master Trainer. But what does it take to be a great personal trainer? Many of the skills that make me successful today, I learned on the rugby pitch. 

Some of the most professional personal trainers I have seen operating on the gym floor have been present or ex-rugby players. It’s a sport where you have no place to hide! You are one of fifteen team players with a very specific skill. You might be a speedy winger or you could be a powerful front row player.

Why you ask is this relevant to personal training?

Phil Calvert
 

February 09, 2013 // Category: Fitness Community

The technology revolution is not the only force impacting the future of fitness. There is another factor contributing to the changing needs of exercisers: evolution.  Our bodies have been changing since the dawn of human kind. The athletic, hunter-gatherer-nomadic lifestyle has given way over time to a more sedentary and unregulated life for most. A life comprised of largely unilateral movements. The effects of our current day-to-day activity (or lack thereof) have shaped the growing fitness trend known as corrective exercise and postural training.

Corrective exercise techniques can be utilized to help relieve pain and some even claim it can reverse improper posture. 

Amir Lafdaigui
 

November 20, 2012 // Category: Fitness Advisor

If you’re more likely to cut ties than go steady with your cardio routine, it’s time to recommit as cardiovascular exercise is one of the best ways to ensure the long-term health of your heart. Try these workouts and rekindle the magic of your routine:

 

 

Take On the Treadmill 

Add variety to spice up your cardio workout by changing speed, resistance and incline throughout the workout to alternate high intensity intervals with recovery.

  • Start with a five-minute warm up at 3 mph with a 1 percent incline.
  • Follow with five minutes of slow jogging (4 to 5 mph).
  • Pick up the pace (6 mph+) for one minute and run at a 2 percent incline or more.
  • Return to the jogging pace at a 1 percent incline for two minutes.
  • Repeat run/jog intervals 2 to 3 more times before returning to a five-minute walk.
Heather Sieker
 

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